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Easy no wrap short rows

courtney spainhower

So, I've used these short rows for years.  In fact, I'm pretty sure I stumbled upon them when I was researching techniques for Family-Friendly Knits and yet, the exact technique doesn't seem to exist on this here internet.  It is possible I borrowed techniques from other methods and poured them together to create this - I just honestly don't know.  What I do know is that I use this method every time I design short rows and since there doesn't seem to be a tutorial anywhere (a little tid-bit I found out when a sample knitter had some questions and asked if I had a link to a tutorial.  Oh yes, sure, I have a link... let me just google that and.... SIGH) ... so, ta-da!

First things first, I'm going to show how the stitches are executed over Stockinette st for both RS and WS rows.  When I write the instructions into a pattern, they read something like this example: 
"Short row 1: K6, turn, Sl1 P-wise, P11, turn. 
Short row 2: Sl1 P-wise, knit to one stitch before gap, close gap (See Special Instructions), K6, turn. 
Short row 3: Sl1 P-wise, purl to one stitch before gap, close gap, P6, turn. 
Rep Short rows 2 and 3 two more times.
Next row: Sl1 P-wise, knit to end of rnd.
Knit 1 rnd closing gaps as you come to them. "

And then of course, there are the "Special Instructions" that read something like this:

Closing Short Row Gaps

RS facing: Work to stitch before gap on left needle.  The slipped stitch is the next stitch on the left needle.  Pick up the stitch around the slipped stitch with right needle and transfer onto left needle, then knit the two stitches together.

WS facing: Work to stitch before gap on left needle.  The slipped stitch is the next stitch on the left needle.  Pick up the stitch around slipped stitch with the right needle and transfer onto left needle, then knit the two stitches together TBL.

And now to the good stuff.

I've knit to where I'm ready to turn the work.

I've knit to where I'm ready to turn the work.

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the front.

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the front.

I've purled to where my next turn is going to be placed

I've purled to where my next turn is going to be placed

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the back.

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the back.

I'm now ready to close the gap on a RS facing row.  I've knit to one stitch before the gap.

I'm now ready to close the gap on a RS facing row.  I've knit to one stitch before the gap.

Here is that slipped stitch - the arrow points to the stitch I'm picking up and placing on the needle.

Here is that slipped stitch - the arrow points to the stitch I'm picking up and placing on the needle.

Now I've transferred that stitch onto the left needle.

Now I've transferred that stitch onto the left needle.

Finally, I'm knitting the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the left needle.

Finally, I'm knitting the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the left needle.

Moving on to the WS rows, here I've purled to one stitch before the gap.

Moving on to the WS rows, here I've purled to one stitch before the gap.

Again, we see thatstitch from the previous WS row positioned around the slipped stitch on the needle.

Again, we see thatstitch from the previous WS row positioned around the slipped stitch on the needle.

I've transfered the picked up stitch onto the left needle.

I've transfered the picked up stitch onto the left needle.

And of course, I can now purl the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the needle through the back.

And of course, I can now purl the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the needle through the back.

The finished short rows with the RS of the fabric facing.  Look Ma, no gaps!

The finished short rows with the RS of the fabric facing.  Look Ma, no gaps!

As you can see, once you know what you're looking for, it's a breeze to work up - and as I mentioned previously, it's the only short row method I've used in my designs for years.  After blocking, the stitches lay out even more evenly creating a fabric with almost no sign of short row shaping at all. 

I hope this has been informative, and if you know if I made this up or if it actually exists elsewhere, please let me know!  Ever since I started looking for it this morning, it's been driving me crazy.

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