Easy no wrap short rows

So, I've used these short rows for years.  In fact, I'm pretty sure I stumbled upon them when I was researching techniques for Family-Friendly Knits and yet, the exact technique doesn't seem to exist on this here internet.  It is possible I borrowed techniques from other methods and poured them together to create this - I just honestly don't know.  What I do know is that I use this method every time I design short rows and since there doesn't seem to be a tutorial anywhere (a little tid-bit I found out when a sample knitter had some questions and asked if I had a link to a tutorial.  Oh yes, sure, I have a link... let me just google that and.... SIGH) ... so, ta-da!

First things first, I'm going to show how the stitches are executed over Stockinette st for both RS and WS rows.  When I write the instructions into a pattern, they read something like this example: 
"Short row 1: K6, turn, Sl1 P-wise, P11, turn. 
Short row 2: Sl1 P-wise, knit to one stitch before gap, close gap (See Special Instructions), K6, turn. 
Short row 3: Sl1 P-wise, purl to one stitch before gap, close gap, P6, turn. 
Rep Short rows 2 and 3 two more times.
Next row: Sl1 P-wise, knit to end of rnd.
Knit 1 rnd closing gaps as you come to them. "

And then of course, there are the "Special Instructions" that read something like this:

Closing Short Row Gaps

RS facing: Work to stitch before gap on left needle.  The slipped stitch is the next stitch on the left needle.  Pick up the stitch around the slipped stitch with right needle and transfer onto left needle, then knit the two stitches together.

WS facing: Work to stitch before gap on left needle.  The slipped stitch is the next stitch on the left needle.  Pick up the stitch around slipped stitch with the right needle and transfer onto left needle, then knit the two stitches together TBL.

And now to the good stuff.

 I've knit to where I'm ready to turn the work.

I've knit to where I'm ready to turn the work.

 After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the front.

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the front.

 I've purled to where my next turn is going to be placed

I've purled to where my next turn is going to be placed

 After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the back.

After turning, I've slipped the first stitch p-wise with the yarn to the back.

 I'm now ready to close the gap on a RS facing row.  I've knit to one stitch before the gap.

I'm now ready to close the gap on a RS facing row.  I've knit to one stitch before the gap.

 Here is that slipped stitch - the arrow points to the stitch I'm picking up and placing on the needle.

Here is that slipped stitch - the arrow points to the stitch I'm picking up and placing on the needle.

 Now I've transferred that stitch onto the left needle.

Now I've transferred that stitch onto the left needle.

 Finally, I'm knitting the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the left needle.

Finally, I'm knitting the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the left needle.

 Moving on to the WS rows, here I've purled to one stitch before the gap.

Moving on to the WS rows, here I've purled to one stitch before the gap.

 Again, we see thatstitch from the previous WS row positioned around the slipped stitch on the needle.

Again, we see thatstitch from the previous WS row positioned around the slipped stitch on the needle.

 I've transfered the picked up stitch onto the left needle.

I've transfered the picked up stitch onto the left needle.

 And of course, I can now purl the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the needle through the back.

And of course, I can now purl the slipped stitch together with the picked up stitch on the needle through the back.

 The finished short rows with the RS of the fabric facing.  Look Ma, no gaps!

The finished short rows with the RS of the fabric facing.  Look Ma, no gaps!

As you can see, once you know what you're looking for, it's a breeze to work up - and as I mentioned previously, it's the only short row method I've used in my designs for years.  After blocking, the stitches lay out even more evenly creating a fabric with almost no sign of short row shaping at all. 

I hope this has been informative, and if you know if I made this up or if it actually exists elsewhere, please let me know!  Ever since I started looking for it this morning, it's been driving me crazy.

X

Breaking news

I have a lot of knitting needles.

Like, 3 sets of interchangeable points, sort of 2 sets of double points in a mismatched way, a set of mini double points, and just about any size circular and straight needle you could imagine.  And so, today when I broke my size US4 wooden interchangeable points while working on a new design, I figured I could just grab a set of my metal points and go about my day.  I grabbed the last thing I was certain I had used my US4 needles to fiddle with and ... those are US5.  What about this one?  US6.  And the great needle search commenced.

I would like to say that at no point during this search did I have any sort of melt down.  I would like to say that I didn't cry because that would be ridiculous.  I would like to say I didn't get pissed at my husband, pissed at my laundry, pissed at my *always* dirty floors... but I did.  I did all of those things.  I also cleaned, organized, sorted, wound, stacked, stashed, and cleared out every box, bag, basket, and bin I have any knitting related items in.  I found every single missing set of interchangeable points except my US4.

On 2016

My final pattern released in 2016 was the Arrowhead Stole (a contribution and cover girl for Interweave Press, F+W Media collection, Garter Stitch Revival).

It's a nice pattern to close the year with... simple and lovely... a piece that reminds me of summer's eventual return... a true warm weather stole knit in a crunchy, cool yarn.  In fact, it's a taste of my recent transformation as a designer.  I'm getting down to the bare bones of where I want to go with knitwear, how I want to approach design, and what feels appropriate for seasonal pieces.  Things I once would have thought nothing of years past (like Icelandic wool sweaters for spring) utterly repel me.  However, like any other period of growth/change, I become rigid in a new way of thinking and then soften again with newfound knowledge. But this is all looking ahead rather than back - back into 2016 - *the year of "persevere" when in reality, it ended up being the year of "hold-on-for-dear-life" 

Looking back, 3 things stand out - first, the year went by so quickly, too quickly, months and seasons tumbled over each other at such a rapid pace I could hardly keep up.  Second, from start to finish, people were divided.  Race issues, gender issues, political issues... every time I turned around.  It forced me off social media for the most part and aided in my already steady retreat inward.  Lastly, 2016 was a big year of change for our family.  Mae's Trichotillomania spiked, causing strife and periods of melancholy.  Alizah chipped away at her chrysalis to expose a glimpse at the gorgeous creature forming within (that girl is a force).  And we made huge strides toward our goals on the homefront, adding ducks, chickens, and fruit trees to our little plot of earth, along with the start of our gardens. 

In the end though, I knew '16 would be a tough one for this monkey girl (navigating a monkey year) and so I avoided conflict, stayed steady, and wore a lucky amulet every day.  Hubs, on the other hand, was destined for good fortune.  We couldn't see the path, but as always, time cleared the way for us and the path was revealed.  I was grateful for his promotions and ability to leap over adversity like a gazelle... it gave our family stability and balance.

There seems to be a general "good riddance" attitude toward 2016.  Even though I felt mostly under water for the past 365 days, I don't feel that beaming optimism for the new year.  I feel older.  I feel rooted.  I feel rushed.  I am, however, looking forward to breaking the spell of introversion that I sank deeply into.  I also look forward to getting my feet out of the mud and getting back into design with a new, fresh perspective.  Mostly, I look forward to making it to the other side with my family intact and my little homestead growing.  **At this point, I feel like anyone who really knows me, knows about my New Year's Mantras... this post still resonates with me as I was saying farewell to 2014 - here is a small excerpt:  

 I don't make resolutions, as some of you already know, but I do set a mantra for myself.  2014 was simply "stay steady" and 2013's "be brave". I haven't quite settled on one for 2015 yet, but the past two years have served me well and have been years of personal and professional growth, and unexpected adventures.  Truly, I want to continue on in this way - staying steady, being brave, and pushing those two tasks further than I ever thought possible... and I wish that for all of you, too.  #pushitfurther

But, I was on a high when 2014 closed.  2016 hardened me.  And since I've been setting a word, phrase, or general idea to lean on for years, out of necessity and creation, I notice that this year, the not-even-day-old-year of 2017, social media is all a buzz with everyone's "word for the year" and I'm realizing quickly that the mantra I set for myself weeks ago is going to be far more difficult for me to lean into than I could have imagined.

2017.  Open, Flex.

And yet, I'm leaning back into the feeling I felt most of 2016 (hide and lock doors!).  I wish I could talk to 2014/2015 Courtney.  I bet she would have excellent advice for me right now.